Missing London town during lockdown: Memories of London (Edmondo De Amicis, 1873), An Excursion to the Poor Districts of London (Louis Laurent Simonin, 1862), Absolute Beginners (Colin MacInnes, 1959) and In Our Mad and Furious City (Guy Gunaratne, 2018)

Facebook threw a joyous memory my way the other day: a jaunt I made into London with an almost 7 month old Rufus in February 2018.  I took Ru to the blitzed-church-ruins-turned-into-public-garden of St Dunstan in the East, where his dad had proposed to me almost a year to the day before he was born,…

The Wake by Paul Kingsnorth

In 21st century England, 70% of the land is still owned by less than 1% of the population; the second most unequal rate of land ownership on the planet, after Brazil.  It is questionable whether this would  be the case had the Normans not concentrated all of it in the hands of the King and…

Celebrating International Women’s Day 2018!

Following our posts to celebrate International Women’s Day in 2016 and 2017, we’re back again for #IWD2018 with a bounty of books to explore woman’s place in the world. Set in Rosenau, an isolated alpine farming community in Austria, Homestead by Rosina Lippi begins with a mysterious love letter – its intended recipient potentially being…

Christmas Entertainments: 1740

This week at Brontë’s Page Turners we’ll be getting in the festive mood with a selection of Yuletide-themed literary treats. Christmas Entertainment 1740 is a reproduction of an 18th century tract about all things festive. It is published by the excellent Pryor Publications who specialize in facsimile reproductions of old books. It may be almost…

The History of Myddle by Richard Gough (1701)

This week’s random book of the week flavours social history with a Heat magazine vibe. So in 1701 this fella Richard Gough (1635-1723) compiled the history of every family which held a pew in the church at Myddle, a small village in Shropshire. On first appraisal, he is rather like Paul Whitehouse’s character on Harry…

The Chapter of Kings by Mr Collins (1818)

This week’s Random Book of the Week (see, I am trying to keep this up!) is a 200-year-old children’s royal history book that doubles up as an adult satire on the British Monarchy. ‘Mr Collins’, an unknown publisher, wrote The Chapter of Kings in 1818, during the Regency of the Prince of Wales. It tells…