What exactly does one read during a pandemic?!

I had hoped to restore a bit of humour to Bronte’s Page Turners, given my recent focus on subjects as heartening as depression and immortality, but then BOOM: along comes a pandemic like Covid-19, and like most people I am navigating an ever-present readiness to sob and howl What. The. Actual. Fudge. Yesterday evening, as…

Celebrating International Women’s Day 2018!

Following our posts to celebrate International Women’s Day in 2016 and 2017, we’re back again for #IWD2018 with a bounty of books to explore woman’s place in the world. Set in Rosenau, an isolated alpine farming community in Austria, Homestead by Rosina Lippi begins with a mysterious love letter – its intended recipient potentially being…

Books ‘N’ Babies!

Upon discovering I was pregnant this time last year, my ponder of the forthcoming journey dwelled on two things: 1) ‘Wow I’m up the duff and gonna be a muvver!’ Who signed that off?’ etc and 2) ‘Finally,  some time to deal with Bertie aka my TBR book case, so monstrous it inspired a rap,…

Cities of the World by Georg Braun and Franz Hogenberg (1617)

Cities of the World has been described as ‘Google Earth’s ancestor’. Focusing on Europe but including important cities and landmarks in Asia, Africa, and Latin America, the maps in this beautiful book were originally created and published as six volumes of the Civitates Orbis Terrarum between 1572 and 1617. Taschen’s volume includes 564  original engravings (mostly…

Mother: Portraits by 40 Great Artists by Juliet Heslewood

This week’s Random Book of the Week is a quick post as I shortly have to make the trek from Sarf to Norf London in order to worship at the altar of The Woman Who Gave Me Life. Yes folks, it’s Mothering Sunday, that day of the year when Clintons et al make a lot…

Art and Feminism, edited by Helena Reckitt with a survey by Peggy Phelan

Happy International Women’s Day! Given that yesterday’s IWD post was rather bleak, I thought today I’d cheer us up (sort of…) with some feminist art. Art and Feminism is published by the excellent Phaidon and provides an overview of female artists who have explored feminist themes in their art. As well as an introduction to…

26 Treasures: 4 national museums, 104 objects, 62 words each

I found 26 Treasures in the National Gallery New Year sale. The fact it only cost me One English Pound instead of £15.99 was a significant factor in my purchase: it could facilitate the illusion of my intellectualism (essential in masking the reality that a substantial proportion of my time is spent reading the gossip…

Les Tres Riches Heures Du Duc De Berry (1416)

This week’s Random Book of the Week was a beautiful bargain find at one of the legendary basement sales at Any Amount of Books in Charing Cross Road. These basement sales tend to turn London bibliophiles into madder versions of their already mad bibliophile selves. I once got chatting to a very old man who,…

The Secret Museum by Molly Oldfield

First off, I must give a North London Shout Out to my fellow nerd Laura Blower (aka Blow Town – we like to give each other potential rap names, should the need for a swift career change ever arise), who has form for generously giving me nerd-tastic books. For my last birthday Laura bought me the excellent A…

The Queen: Art and Image (National Portrait Gallery)

Next up in ‘Monarchy Week’ at Brontë’s Page Turners, a book that explores what it means if yesterday’s ‘long and winding road’ of ancestry makes you (essentially) the most recognizable face in the world. The Queen: Art and Image tracks the changing representation of the Queen’s image in art over the course of her 63-year…

The Obstacle Race by Germaine Greer

Next up in my week-long recommendation of books in celebration of International Women’s Day – the wonderful field of Art. Let me start off by saying that I appreciate Germaine Greer has demonstrated some contentious views – that a daughter kissing her father goodnight contributes to the sexualization of girls, that transgender women are not real…