Votes For Women and other plays, edited and introduced by Susan Croft

Continuing our International Women’s Week theme, an anthology of rare early 20th century plays written by female dramatists about the struggle for female suffrage. Susan Croft’s anthology includes seven ‘suffrage plays’, including the comparatively well-known Votes for Women (Elizabeth Robins) and How the Vote Was Won (Cicely Hamilton and Christopher St. John), and other rarer…

Art and Feminism, edited by Helena Reckitt with a survey by Peggy Phelan

Happy International Women’s Day! Given that yesterday’s IWD post was rather bleak, I thought today I’d cheer us up (sort of…) with some feminist art. Art and Feminism is published by the excellent Phaidon and provides an overview of female artists who have explored feminist themes in their art. As well as an introduction to…

Some Eminent Women of Our Times by Mrs Henry Fawcett (1889)

Following on from last year’s set of posts, to celebrate International Women’s Day on March 8th, this week I will be posting about a selection of books connected to women’s place in the world. To kick things off this year, a second-hand find filled with unexpected hidden treasures within. Some Eminent Women of Our Times…

The Life of Rebecca Jones by Angharad Price

Bore da!  To celebrate St David’s Day – I’m an eighth Welsh, so will admit a vested interest – a book that has been hailed as the ‘first Welsh classic of the 21st century’. The author Angharad Price’s family has farmed in the Maesglasau valley for 1000 years. The Life of Rebecca Jones is an…

26 Treasures: 4 national museums, 104 objects, 62 words each

I found 26 Treasures in the National Gallery New Year sale. The fact it only cost me One English Pound instead of £15.99 was a significant factor in my purchase: it could facilitate the illusion of my intellectualism (essential in masking the reality that a substantial proportion of my time is spent reading the gossip…

Catullus: the complete poems for modern readers

For Valentine’s Day today, some Roman poetry that is both bawdy and touching. Catullus  (c. 84 – 54 BC) was a Latin ‘neoteric’ poet in Republican Rome – focused on smaller scale stories borne from personal experience, in stark contrast to the ‘Homeric’ poetry which portrayed the feats of classical heroes. His poems were written…

Discovering Surnames: Their Origins and Meanings by J.W. Freeman

As this week’s Random Book of the Week I chose an old book of my Nan‘s, Discovering Surnames, as I wanted to show you the very cute retro 80s book cover. I thought I’d better actually read it before posting. No fraudulent activity on Brontë’s Page Turners. Well I’m glad I spent Sunday afternoon with…

The Penguin 60s Classics Boxed Set (1995)

To celebrate the 60th anniversary of the establishment of Penguin books – you remember, Sir Allen Lane’s ‘ag’ at failing to find a decent book to purchase for his onward journey at Exeter train station prompting him to launch high-brow paperbacks for the masses, rather than simply frowning meaningfully at the WH Smith lady like…

Twenty-Four Hours in the Life of a Woman by Stefan Zweig (1927)

This 1927 novella is a great introduction to the work of Austrian playwright, journalist and biographer Stefan Zweig, one of the most popular writers in the world in the 1920s/30s who has been enjoying a revival of late. His own tale is not a happy one. Spooked by Hitler’s rise to power in Germany, Zweig…